ASSESSMENT OF SKELETAL FLUOROSIS AMONG CHILDREN IN TWO BLOCKS OF RURAL AREA, JAIPUR DISTRICT, RAJASTHAN, INDIA

  • Chetram Meena Department of Biotechnology, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University, Noida - 201 303, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Supriya Dwivedi Department of Biotechnology, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University, Noida - 201 303, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Suman Rathore Department of Biotechnology, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University, Noida - 201 303, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Zaozianlungliu Gonmei Department of Foods and Nutrition, Amity Institute of Food Technology, Amity University, Noida - 201 303, Uttar Pradesh, India.
  • Toteja Gs Desert MedicineResearch Centre, Indian Council of Medical Research, Jodhpur - 342 005, Rajasthan, India.
  • Kumud Bala Department of Biotechnology, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University, Noida - 201 303, Uttar Pradesh, India
  • Mohanty Ss Desert MedicineResearch Centre, Indian Council of Medical Research, Jodhpur - 342 005, Rajasthan, India.

Abstract

Objective: The objective of the present study was carried out to explore the potential association between fluoride (F) concentration in drinking water and severity of skeletal fluorosis (SF) among the children of rural area.

Methods: SF survey was conducted among the children (6-14 years) in two blocks such as (a) Jamwa Ramgarh block in Heerawala, Palera, Nayabas, Saipur, and Birasana and (b) Amber block in Sunder Ka Bas, Chitanukalan, Jugalpura, Peelwa, and Sirsali in Jaipur district of Rajasthan, India, of the study villages. A total of 150 (93 male and 57 female) children were surveyed. The role of fluoride (F) concentration in drinking water in the etiology of SF and the cases of SF was assessed using. The United Nations Children’s Fund three clinical test. The fluoride content in the source of drinking water was estimated by fluoride ion-specific electrode (Thermo Scientific Orion Star A329, USA).

Results: The fluoride concentration in hand pump (Hp) water which ranges from 2.1 to 15 parts per million (ppm) and tube well (Tw) water ranges from 0.7 to 6.2 ppm in Jamwa Ramgarh block and Amber block, Hp water which ranges from 0.8 to 5.1 ppm and Tw water ranges from 0.8 to 4.8 ppm. The prevalence of SF 9 (12%) in Jamwa Ramgarh block and 6 (8%) in Amber block out of 75 children were examined in each block. Significantly increase in fluoride level in drinking water is positively correlated with SF.

Conclusion: This study has shown the relation of SF to high fluoride levels in the source of drinking water is a major risk factor for SF among the children. SF is a threat among the children in two blocks of rural area, Jaipur district, Rajasthan.

Keywords: Skeletal fluorosis, United Nations Children’s Fund clinical test, F Ion-specific electrode, Jaipur district.

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Meena, C., S. Dwivedi, S. Rathore, Z. Gonmei, T. Gs, K. Bala, and M. Ss. “ASSESSMENT OF SKELETAL FLUOROSIS AMONG CHILDREN IN TWO BLOCKS OF RURAL AREA, JAIPUR DISTRICT, RAJASTHAN, INDIA”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 10, no. 9, Sept. 2017, pp. 322-5, doi:10.22159/ajpcr.2017.v10i9.19993.
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