DRUG INTERACTIONS AMONG PATIENTS WITH HYPERTENSION TAKING ANGIOTENSINCONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS IN AN INDONESIAN HOSPITAL

  • Santi Purna Sari Clinical Pharmacy Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, 16424, Indonesia.
  • Afi Fauziyah Darajat Clinical Pharmacy Laboratory, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, 16424, Indonesia.
  • Binar Nursanti Division of Pharmacy, Karya Bhakti Pratiwi Hospital, Bogor, 16880, Indonesia.

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to analyze the drug interactions associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors for treating hypertension
at Karya Bhakti Pratiwi Hospital between July and December 2016.
Methods: This was an analytical, descriptive, cross-sectional study based on the prescription and medical record data of hospitalized patients treated
with an ACE inhibitor and one or more other drugs. Data were included by purposive sampling.
Results: The final analysis was conducted with 120 prescriptions from 71 patients. We found that ACE inhibitors were associated with 139 potential
interactions with other drugs in 75 prescriptions (53.96%); of these, 52 were major interactions and 87 were moderate interactions. The Mann–
Whitney U-test confirmed that the potential drug interactions were significantly associated with polypharmacy (p<0.05), but the Chi-square test
showed no association with either gender or pathophysiology (p>0.05). Finally, the Kruskal–Wallis test revealed no significant relationship between
age and potential drug interactions (p>0.05).
Conclusion: The final analysis was conducted with 120 prescriptions from 71 patients. We found that ACE inhibitors were associated with 139
potential interactions with other drugs in 75 prescriptions (53.96%); of these, 52 were major interactions and 87 were moderate interactions. The
Mann–Whitney U-test confirmed that the potential drug interactions were significantly associated with polypharmacy (p<0.05), but the Chi-square
test showed no association with either gender or pathophysiology (p>0.05). Finally, the Kruskal–Wallis test revealed no significant relationship
between age and potential drug interactions (p>0.05).

Keywords: ACE inhibitor, Angiotensin-converting enzyme, Drug interaction, Hypertension, Polypharmacy.

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How to Cite
Sari, S. P., Darajat, A. F., & Nursanti, B. (2018). DRUG INTERACTIONS AMONG PATIENTS WITH HYPERTENSION TAKING ANGIOTENSINCONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS IN AN INDONESIAN HOSPITAL. International Journal of Applied Pharmaceutics, 10(1), 138-141. https://doi.org/10.22159/ijap.2018.v10s1.29
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