IN VITRO ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITIES FROM VARIOUS EXTRACTS OF BANANA PEELS USING ABTS, DPPH ASSAYS AND CORRELATION WITH PHENOLIC, FLAVONOID, CAROTENOID CONTENT

  • Irda Fidrianny School of Pharmacy, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia.
  • Kiki Rizki R. School of Pharmacy, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia.
  • M. Insanu School of Pharmacy, Bandung Institute of Technology, Indonesia.

Abstract

Objectives: The objectives of this research were to study antioxidant capacity from various extracts of banana peels using two methods of antioxidant testing which were ABTS (2.2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and DPPH (2.2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) and correlation of total phenolic, flavonoid and carotenoid content in various extracts of banana peels with ABTS and DPPH antioxidant capacities.


Methods: Extraction was conducted by reflux using various solvents. The extracts were vaporated using rotavapor. Then antioxidant capacities were tested using ABTS and DPPH assays. Determination of total phenolic, flavonoid and carotenoid content were performed by spectrophotometry UV-Vis and its correlation with ABTS and DPPH antioxidant capacities were analyzed by Pearson method.


Results: AL2 (ethyl acetate peels extract of ambon lumut banana) had the highest ABTS scavenging capacity with IC50 1.91 ppm and MU3 had the highest DPPH scavenging activities with EC50 4.39 ppm. MU2 (ethyl acetate peels extract of muli banana) contained the highest total phenolic (3.99 g GAE/100 g), MU2 had highest flavonoid content (6.08 g QE/100 g) and MU2 had also the highest carotenoid 0.34 g BET/100 g.


Conclusions. There was positively high correlation between total phenolic content in muli banana peels with its antioxidant activity using DPPH assays. ABTS scavenging capacities in muli banana and ambon lumut banana peels had positively high correlation with their DPPH scavenging activities.

Keywords: Antioxidants, ABTS, DPPH, Banana peels, Flavonoid, Phenolic, Carotenoid

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Fidrianny, I., K. R. R., and M. Insanu. “IN VITRO ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITIES FROM VARIOUS EXTRACTS OF BANANA PEELS USING ABTS, DPPH ASSAYS AND CORRELATION WITH PHENOLIC, FLAVONOID, CAROTENOID CONTENT”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 6, no. 8, Aug. 2014, pp. 299-03, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/2783.
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