ACTIVITY SALIVARY BACTERIA OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA CHILDREN IN CHEMOTHERAPY PHASE

  • Aliyah Abdul Muthalib Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta - 10430, Indonesia.
  • Sarworini B Budiardjo Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta - 10430, Indonesia.
  • Margaretha Suharsini Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta - 10430, Indonesia.

Abstract

 Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the differences activity of salivary Streptococcus mutans bacteria in children suffer acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in phase of chemotherapy, induction, intensification/consolidation, and maintenance.

Methods: This study was a laboratory observational, and cross-sectional method, conducted 19 ALL children in phase of chemotherapy, induction, intensification/consolidation, and maintenance. 2 mm of dental plaque was collected from mesiobuccal first permanent molar and incubated for 48 h at 37°C, and the bacterial activity of S. mutans measured by Cariostat.

Results: Odds ratio analysis among chemotherapy phase of induction, intensification/consolidation, and maintenance is not significant (p>0.05) differences.

Conclusion: The highest activity bacteria of S. mutans were found in the induction phase

Keywords: Activity bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, ALL, Chemotherapy phase.

Author Biographies

Sarworini B Budiardjo, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta - 10430, Indonesia.
Department of Pediatric Dentistry
Margaretha Suharsini, Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta - 10430, Indonesia.
Department of Pediatric Dentistry

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How to Cite
Muthalib, A. A., S. B. Budiardjo, and M. Suharsini. “ACTIVITY SALIVARY BACTERIA OF ACUTE LYMPHOBLASTIC LEUKEMIA CHILDREN IN CHEMOTHERAPY PHASE”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 11, no. 3, Mar. 2018, pp. 47-49, doi:10.22159/ajpcr.2018.v11i3.23274.
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