PRESERVATION OF MICROBIAL SPOILAGE OF FOOD BY BIOSURFACTANT-BASED COATING

  • Vikrant Sharma Department of Microbiology, School of Bioengineering and Biosciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab, India.
  • Muskaan Garg Department of Microbiology, School of Bioengineering and Biosciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab, India.
  • Devismita Talukdar Department of Microbiology, School of Bioengineering and Biosciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab, India.
  • Pallavi Thakur Department of Microbiology, School of Bioengineering and Biosciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab, India.
  • Marius Henkel Institute of Food Science and Biotechnology, Hohenheim University, Stuttgart, Germany.
  • Deepansh Sharma Amity Institute of Microbial Technology, Amity University, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India.
  • Gaurav Kumar Department of Microbiology, School of Bioengineering and Biosciences, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, Punjab, India.

Abstract

Objectives: Microbial spoilage of food is one of the leading causes of food scarcity worldwide, which could have devastating effect on the socioeconomic of any country. Along with classical food preservation methods, various innovative approaches can significantly increase the food safety. Biosurfactants are the amphiphilic microbial metabolites, while many of them have potential antimicrobial properties and therefore can be used for food preservation.

Methods: During this study, three biosurfactants obtained from Bacillus subtilis (two of them) and Pseudomonas sp. (rhamnolipid) were screened for their antifungal activity against Aspergillus oryzae (MTCC 1846), Fusarium solani (MTCC 350), and Curvularia sp. by various in vitro and in vivo methods.

Results: During this study, among three surfactants only Pseudomonas sp. biosurfactant (rhamnolipid) exhibited significant antifungal activity against A. oryzae, F. solani, and Curvularia sp. Further, the rhamnolipid coating (1 mg/ml) on lemon, potato and tomato protected them from fungal spoilage up to 15 days at room temperature in contrast to untreated samples which started spoiling in 6–7 days.

Discussion: Above findings emphasis on the potential use of biosurfactants for the preservation of food items, however, a detailed study to ensure the safety of biosurfactant is of prerequisite. 
Keywords: Biosurfactant, Food spoilage, Rhamnolipid, Amphipathic, Food preservation.

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Sharma, V., M. Garg, D. Talukdar, P. Thakur, M. Henkel, D. Sharma, and G. Kumar. “PRESERVATION OF MICROBIAL SPOILAGE OF FOOD BY BIOSURFACTANT-BASED COATING”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 11, no. 14, July 2018, pp. 98-101, doi:10.22159/ajpcr.2018.v11s2.28592.
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