CONTENT OF FATTY ACIDS IN CORN (ZEA MAYS L.) OIL FROM ECUADOR

  • Carrillo W Research Department, Laboratory of Functional Foods, Faculty of Foods Science and Engineering, Technical University of Ambato, Av. Los Chasquis y Rio Payamino, Campus Huachi, CP 1801334, Ambato, Ecuador.
  • Carpio C Research Department, Faculty of Health and Human Sciences, Bolivar State University, Academic Campus “Alpachaca” Av. Ernesto Che Guevara s/n y Av. Gabriel Secaira, EC. 020150, Guaranda, Ecuador.
  • Morales D Research Department, Laboratory of Functional Foods, Faculty of Foods Science and Engineering, Technical University of Ambato, Av. Los Chasquis y Rio Payamino, Campus Huachi, CP 1801334, Ambato, Ecuador.
  • Vilcacundo E 2Research Department, Faculty of Health and Human Sciences, Bolivar State University, Academic Campus “Alpachaca” Av. Ernesto Che Guevara s/n y Av. Gabriel Secaira, EC. 020150, Guaranda, Ecuador.
  • Álvarez M Research Department, Laboratory of Functional Foods, Faculty of Foods Science and Engineering, Technical University of Ambato, Av. Los Chasquis y Rio Payamino, Campus Huachi, CP 1801334, Ambato, Ecuador.
  • Silva M Research Department, Laboratory of Functional Foods, Faculty of Foods Science and Engineering, Technical University of Ambato, Av. Los Chasquis y Rio Payamino, Campus Huachi, CP 1801334, Ambato, Ecuador.

Abstract

 

 Objective: The aim of this work was to determine the fatty acids content in corn seeds oil (Zea mays) sample cultivated in Ecuador.

Methods: Corn oil was obtained from corn oil seeds using the cold pressing method. Methyl esters fatty acids analysis were carried out using the gas chromatography (GC) method with a mass selective detector and using the database library NIST 14.L to identify the compounds present in the corn seed oil.

Results: Methyl esters fatty acids were identified from corn (Z. mays) seeds using the GC mass spectrometer (GC-MS) analytical method. Fatty acids were analyzed as methyl esters on a capillary column DB-WAX 122-7062 with a good separation of palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, elaidic acid, linoleic acid, arachidic acid, and linolenic acid. The structure of methyl esters fatty acids was determined using the GS-MS method. Corn oil has a high content of linoleic acid (omega 6) with a value of 52.68% of the total content of fatty acids in corn oil and 29.70% of oleic acid (omega 9) of the total content of fatty acids in corn oil. The sample presented a value of 12.57% of palmitic acid.

Conclusions: Corn oil shows a good content of fatty acids omega 6 and 9. The higher value was of omega 6 with 52.68% content. Corn oil has a good proportion of polyunsaturated of lipids (53.80%) and 14.86% of saturated lipids.

Keywords: Corn, Zea mays, Fatty acids, Lipids.

Author Biographies

Carrillo W, Research Department, Laboratory of Functional Foods, Faculty of Foods Science and Engineering, Technical University of Ambato, Av. Los Chasquis y Rio Payamino, Campus Huachi, CP 1801334, Ambato, Ecuador.
Facultad de Ciencia e Ingeniería en Aliementos
Carpio C, Research Department, Faculty of Health and Human Sciences, Bolivar State University, Academic Campus “Alpachaca” Av. Ernesto Che Guevara s/n y Av. Gabriel Secaira, EC. 020150, Guaranda, Ecuador.
FCIAL
Morales D, Research Department, Laboratory of Functional Foods, Faculty of Foods Science and Engineering, Technical University of Ambato, Av. Los Chasquis y Rio Payamino, Campus Huachi, CP 1801334, Ambato, Ecuador.
FCIAL
Vilcacundo E, 2Research Department, Faculty of Health and Human Sciences, Bolivar State University, Academic Campus “Alpachaca” Av. Ernesto Che Guevara s/n y Av. Gabriel Secaira, EC. 020150, Guaranda, Ecuador.
FCIAL
Álvarez M, Research Department, Laboratory of Functional Foods, Faculty of Foods Science and Engineering, Technical University of Ambato, Av. Los Chasquis y Rio Payamino, Campus Huachi, CP 1801334, Ambato, Ecuador.
FCIAL

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W, C., C. C, M. D, V. E, M Álvarez, and S. M. “CONTENT OF FATTY ACIDS IN CORN (ZEA MAYS L.) OIL FROM ECUADOR”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 10, no. 8, July 2018, pp. 150-3, doi:10.22159/ajpcr.2017.v10i8.18786.
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