ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITIES OF DIFFERENT POLARITY EXTRACTS FROM THREE ORGANS OF MAKRUT LIME (CITRUS HYSTRIX DC) AND CORRELATION WITH TOTAL FLAVONOID, PHENOLIC, CAROTENOID CONTENT

  • Irda Fidrianny School of Pharmacy Bandung Institute of Technology
  • Yurika Johan School of Pharmacy Bandung Institute of Technology
  • Sukrasno - School of Pharmacy Bandung Institute of Technology

Abstract

ABSTRACT
Objectives: The objectives of this research were to study antioxidant activities from various extracts of three organs of makrut lime (Citrus hystrix)
using two methods of antioxidant assays, which were 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC);
and correlation of total flavonoid, phenolic, and carotenoid content in various extracts of three organs of makrut lime with IC50 of DPPH antioxidant
activities and EC50 of CUPRAC capacities.
Methods: Extraction was performed by reflux apparatus using different polarity solvents. The extracts were evaporated using rotary evaporator.
Antioxidant capacities were tested using DPPH and CUPRAC assays. Determination of total phenolic, flavonoid and carotenoid content performed by
ultraviolet-visible and their correlation with IC50 of DPPH scavenging activities and EC50 of CUPRAC capacities were analyzed by Pearson's method.
Results: Ethyl acetate stem extract of makrut lime (ST2) had the lowest IC50 of DPPH scavenging activity 0.6 μg/ml and the lowest EC50 of CUPRAC
capacity 123 μg/ml. N-hexane stem extract of makrut lime (ST1) had the highest total flavonoid content (8.7 g QE/100 g), ethyl acetate stem extract
(ST2) contained the highest total phenolic content (TPC) (8.3 g gallic acid equivalent /100 g and total carotenoid content (1.8 g BE/100 g).
Conclusions: There was negatively high correlation between TPC in peel and stem extracts of makrut lime with their IC50 of DPPH scavenging activity.
EC50 of CUPRAC capacity of leaves, peel and stem extracts of makrut lime had negative and high correlation with their total flavonoid and carotenoid
content. IC50 of DPPH scavenging activities in leaves, peel and stem extracts of makrut lime had no linear result with EC50 of CUPRAC capacities.
Keywords: Antioxidant, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, Cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity, Organs, Makrut lime, Flavonoid, Phenolic, Carotenoid.

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Table 1: Pearson’s correlation coefficient of IC50 of DPPH scavenging activities, EC50 of CUPRAC capacities and TFC, TPC, TCC in various
organs extracts of makrut lime
Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r)
TFC TPC TCC EC50 CUPRAC LE EC50 CUPRAC PE EC50 CUPRAC ST
IC50 DPPH LE −0.014 −0.08 −0.316 0.259
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TFC: Total flavonoid content, TPC: Total phenolic content, TCC: Total carotenoid content, DPPH: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, CUPRAC: Cupric ion reducing
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How to Cite
Fidrianny, I., Y. Johan, and S. -. “ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITIES OF DIFFERENT POLARITY EXTRACTS FROM THREE ORGANS OF MAKRUT LIME (CITRUS HYSTRIX DC) AND CORRELATION WITH TOTAL FLAVONOID, PHENOLIC, CAROTENOID CONTENT”. Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research, Vol. 8, no. 4, July 2015, pp. 239-43, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ajpcr/article/view/6592.
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