EVALUATION OF BANANA (MUSA SP. VAR. NANJANGUD RASA BALE) FLOWER AND PSEUDOSTEM EXTRACTS ON ANTIMICROBIAL, CYTOTOXICITY AND THROMBOLYTIC ACTIVITIES

  • Ramith Ramu Department of Biotechnology, Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering, JSS Institution Camp, Manasagangothri, Mysore 570006, Karnataka, India
  • Prithvi S. Shirahatti Department of Biotechnology, Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering, JSS Institution Camp, Manasagangothri, Mysore 570006, Karnataka, India
  • Farhan Zameer Department of Studies in Biotechnology, Microbiology and Biochemistry, Mahajana Life Science Research Centre, Pooja Bhagavat Memorial Mahajana PG Centre, Mysore 570016, Karnataka, India
  • Dhananjaya B. Lakkapa Toxinology/Toxicology and Drug Discovery Unit, Centre for Emerging Technologies (CET), Jain Global Campus, Jain University, Kanakapura 562112, Karnataka, India
  • M. N. Nagendra Prasad Department of Biotechnology, Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering, JSS Institution Camp, Manasagangothri, Mysore 570006, Karnataka, India

Abstract

Objectives: The present study is centered on potential utilization of banana flower (FB) and pseudostem (PB), as a source of antimicrobial, cytotoxic and thrombolytic contributor, which otherwise is discarded as waste or burnt.

Methods: FB and PB, the by-products of banana cultivation were extracted sequentially using various solvents viz., ether: chloroform (1:1), ethyl acetate, acetone, methanol, ethanol and water. In vitro antimicrobial activity of the extracts was tested against six bacterial strains using standard disc diffusion method and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was performed by microdilution method. Further to validate the safe consumption, extracts were assessed for toxicity evaluation in cell culture against 3T3-L1 cell line (obtained from adipose tissues) using MTT assay.  Also, the thrombolytic activity was performed by clot disruption method.

Results: Phytochemical analysis demonstrated that FB and PB were a rich source of polyphenols (saponins, terpenoids, flavonoids, coumarins), cardiac glycosides and steroids. Extracts possessed antimicrobial activities against all the microorganisms tested, with MIC values in the range between 1.2 to 2.5 mg/ml. The investigation on thrombolytic activity by the aqueous extracts of FB (18%) and PB (13%) expressed a significant percentage of clot lysis with reference to Streptokinase (64%). Also, all the extracts of FB and PB exhibited no cytotoxic effect against 3T3L1 cell line.

Conclusion: The present work demonstrates the antimicrobial, cytotoxic and thrombolytic activities of FB and PB extracts. The activities exhibited could be the basis for their alleged health promoting abilities and serve as new source of natural nutraceutical with potential applications.

 

Keywords: Banana flower, Banana pseudostem, MIC, 3T3L1 cell lines, Clot disruption

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Ramu, R., P. S. Shirahatti, F. Zameer, D. B. Lakkapa, and M. N. N. Prasad. “EVALUATION OF BANANA (MUSA SP. VAR. NANJANGUD RASA BALE) FLOWER AND PSEUDOSTEM EXTRACTS ON ANTIMICROBIAL, CYTOTOXICITY AND THROMBOLYTIC ACTIVITIES”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 7, no. 13, May 2015, pp. 136-40, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/3531.