COPROCESSED EXCIPIENTS OF CROSSLINKED AMYLOSE AND XANTHAN GUM FOR USE IN CONTROLLED RELEASE DOSAGE FORMS

  • Silvia Surini Laboratory of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology Development, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia.
  • Lusiana Ariani Laboratory of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology Development, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia.
  • Kurnia Ss Putri Laboratory of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology Development, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia.
  • Hayun Hayun Laboratory of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology Development, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia.
  • Effionora Anwar Laboratory of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology Development, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universitas Indonesia, Depok, Indonesia.

Abstract

Objective: This study was aimed to obtain a new excipient that can be used as a polymer matrix for the formulation of controlled release dosage forms.
Methods: This study used coprocessing and crosslinking methods on amylose and xanthan gum (XG) to obtain a new excipient that can be used
for controlled release matrix of pharmaceutical dosage forms. The coprocessing step was conducted by drum drying, and the crosslinking step was
prepared using 6 and 12% sodium trimetaphosphate (STMP). The produced novel excipients were characterized in terms of infrared (IR) spectrum,
substitution degree, moisture content, swelling index, and gel strength.
Results: Our results showed that amylose–XG excipients crosslinked using 6% STMP have greater gel strength and better swelling indexes than
excipients crosslinked using 12% STMP. All coprocessed excipients exhibited no differences in their IR spectra, whereas the crosslinked excipients
did, indicating a structural change due to the addition of phosphate groups. Crosslinking amylose–xanthan-coprocessed excipients using 6% STMP
produced degrees of substitution (DSs) of 7–8 phosphates per 100 monomeric subunits. The excipients had a moisture content of 8.21–12.85%, and
the pH of a 1% solution of excipients was 6.21–6.43. In addition, the swelling index and gel strength of the excipient where both amylose and XG were
crosslinked together Were more than 1 where only amylose was crosslinked.
Conclusion: The crosslinking amylose–xanthan-coprocessed excipient using 6% STMP is more suitable for use in controlled release dosage forms,
particularly when the polymer ratio is 1:1.

Keywords: Coprocessing, Crosslinking, High-amylose starch, Xanthan gum, Controlled release dosage forms.

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How to Cite
Surini, S., Ariani, L., Putri, K. S., Hayun, H., & Anwar, E. (2018). COPROCESSED EXCIPIENTS OF CROSSLINKED AMYLOSE AND XANTHAN GUM FOR USE IN CONTROLLED RELEASE DOSAGE FORMS. International Journal of Applied Pharmaceutics, 10(1), 59-65. https://doi.org/10.22159/ijap.2018.v10s1.13
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