PHYTO-ANTIQUORUMONES: AN HERBAL APPROACH FOR BLOCKING BACTERIAL TRAFFICKING AND PATHOGENESIS

  • Beulah K C Department of Biotechnology, Microbiology and Biochemistry, Mahajana Life Science Research Centre, SBRR Mahajana First Grade College, JL Puram, Affiliated to University of Mysore, Mysore 570012, Karnataka, India
  • Aishwarya T Devi Department of Biotechnology, Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering, JSS Institution Campus, Manasagangothri, Mysore 570006, Karnataka, India
  • Waseem K Department of Studies in Chemistry, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore 570006, Karnataka, India
  • Hedgekatte R Department of Biotechnology, Microbiology and Biochemistry, Mahajana Life Science Research Centre, SBRR Mahajana First Grade College, JL Puram, Affiliated to University of Mysore, Mysore 570012, Karnataka, India
  • Nagendra Prasad Mn Department of Biotechnology, Sri Jayachamarajendra College of Engineering, JSS Institution Campus, Manasagangothri, Mysore 570006, Karnataka, India
  • Dhananjaya Bl Toxinology/Toxicology and Drug Discovery Unit, Centre for Emerging Technologies (CET), Jain Global Campus, Jain University, Ramanagara 562112, Karnataka, India
  • Zameer F Department of Biotechnology, Microbiology and Biochemistry, Mahajana Life Science Research Centre, SBRR Mahajana First Grade College, JL Puram, Affiliated to University of Mysore, Mysore 570012, Karnataka, India Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of South Carolina, Columbia 29208, United States of America

Abstract

Over centuries, plants are the richest resource of curative drugs as cited in folklore, traditional and modern medicinal systems and are been used as nutraceuticals, functional food supplements and in pharmaceuticals. Phytochemicals have exhibited beneficial effects against human acute and chronic ailments caused due to microbial pathogens. In recent years, phytochemicals and their derivatives have been extensively used as potent antimicrobials in humans and livestock due to their chemical stability, high bioavailability, low-molecular mass, safe consumption without any side-effect as seen in many antibiotic regimes. These phytocompounds have also been highlighted to function as Quorum Sensing Inhibitors (QSI) or antiquorumones in blocking bacterial pathogenesis preventing their regulatory mechanism and expression of specific set of virulence genes or cascades. However, the role of phytochemicals as QSI has been poorly identified but many of which remain unexplored. Therefore, this review summarizes most of the current scientific contributions focused on the use of plant phytochemicals as antiquorumones, highlighting the significance of plant derived molecules as bacterial inhibitors with larger emphasis on the mechanistic action of biofilm formation and quorum signaling networks mainly N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), autoinducer-2 (AI-2) communications and their attributes in modulating the host immune response. A critical understanding of this complex trio-interaction between humans, microbes and phytochemicals has to be well explored, to exploit the usefulness of these metabolites ultimately paving newer paths for herbal drug discovery and their potential targets leading towards a better quality of life and human welfare.

 

Keywords: Herbal Drugs, Bacterial Biofilms, Antiquorumones, Autoinducer Signaling, Oligopeptides, N-Acyl Homoserine Lactones (AHLs), Food pathogens

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How to Cite
C, B. K., A. T. Devi, W. K, H. R, N. P. Mn, D. Bl, and Z. F. “PHYTO-ANTIQUORUMONES: AN HERBAL APPROACH FOR BLOCKING BACTERIAL TRAFFICKING AND PATHOGENESIS”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 7, no. 13, Sept. 2015, pp. 27-34, https://innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/8543.